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Parker-Hannifin Corporation (PH) Q3 2021 Earnings Call Transcript

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PH earnings call for the period ending September 30, 2021.

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Parker-Hannifin Corporation (PH 1.10%)
Q3 2021 Earnings Call
Nov 4, 2021, 11:00 a.m. ET

Contents:

  • Prepared Remarks
  • Questions and Answers
  • Call Participants

Prepared Remarks:

Operator

Good day, and thank you for standing by. Welcome to the Parker Hannifin Corporation's Fiscal 2022 First Quarter Earnings Release Conference Call and Webcast. [Operator Instructions]

Thank you. I would now like to hand the conference over to your first speaker today, our Chief Financial Officer, Todd Leombruno. Sir, please go ahead.

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Todd M. Leombruno -- Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Thank you, Rachel, and good morning, everyone, and thanks for joining our FY '22 Q1 earnings release webcast. As Rachel said, this is Todd Leombruno, Chief Financial Officer. And joining me today is Tom Williams, our Chairman and Chief Executive Officer; and Lee Banks, our Vice Chairman and President. If I could direct you to Slide two, you'll see our disclosure statement addressing our forward-looking statements and non-GAAP financial measures. As usual, we've included all reconciliations for any non-GAAP measures in today's materials. Those reconciliations and our presentation are accessible under the Investors section on parker.com and will remain available for one year.

The agenda is as usual. Tom is going to begin with some highlights on the quarter. He's got a few strategic comments to you that he'd like to add. And then I'll follow up with a very brief financial summary of our quarter and provide some color to the details on the increase in our guidance that we released this morning. Tom will close with a few closing summary comments, and then we'll open up the lines and take your questions. Just one reminder regarding the pending Meggitt acquisition, we are still bound by the requirements of the U.K. Takeover Code in respect to discussing certain transaction details. So that's just a reminder for everyone.

With -- now, I'll ask you to move to Slide three, and I'll hand it off to Tom.

Thomas L. Williams -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

Thank you, Todd, and good morning, everybody, and welcome to the call. We turned in an outstanding quarter, and it's a great start to FY '22. My thanks to the global team for delivering such a record quarter against the backdrop of strong demand, inflation and supply chain disruptions. So a couple of highlights. Safety performance continued to improve, 17% reduction in recordable incidents on a rolling 12-month basis. Very strong growth, in particular organic growth is 16% year-over-year. It was an extensive list of records. We had seven first quarter records: sales, total company operating margin, net income and EPS. And in each reporting segment, all three of them had all-time operating margin records. EBITDA margin, you can see the reported number was 22.1% adjusted or 210 basis points higher than the prior year. And then down at the bottom, last row, segment operating margin adjusted was 22%. Again, a 210 basis points improvement versus the prior year. Just a great quarter. Very proud of the team, and thank you for your hard work.

Going to Slide four, there's really three things that drive the company, living up our purpose and great generators and deployers of cash and being a top quartile performer. If you go to Slide five, I want to just spend a minute, if you remembered our purpose statement, enabling engineering breakthroughs that lead to a better tomorrow. And we've been trying to show you examples of our purpose in action, helping the company come to life. And one of the secular trends that the pandemic is accelerating is digitization. And in Investor Day, we're going to highlight more for you our content as you look at the whole digital supply chain. As an example, things like 5G infrastructure, electronics, manufacturing, clean rooms, data centers, electronic devices, shielding the thermal management that we do there and of course, transportation to get these products around the world. But the application that I wanted to cover today is semiconductors, given especially the importance of chip demand around the world.

So if you go to Slide six, there's going to be a significant amount of investment, as we all are aware of, in the semi-semiconductor space, and that's going to drive for us double-digit growth over the next several years. Now we are -- we have strong expertise in semiconductor manufacturing. About 1/4 of our division ship them kind of content into the semiconductor space. So to orientate you on this slide, on the left-hand side are the applications that we go into and the right-hand side are our technology. So just a second on the applications. Those six bullets that you see there really are made up of a combination of what we would call fabs and tools. The fabs would be the infrastructure or the transportation part of the process and the tools and the various tools that are in the factory helping to make the semiconductors.

On the left-hand side is the picture of a wafer. And on the center there, that is a picture of an etch tool, a six-chamber etch tool. So on the right are our technologies that we bring to create and bring value for our customers. First segment is process control. So think of that as precise control of gases and liquids in the process. Fluid and gas handling provides a cooling system for the tools, petromechanicals helping with the wafer movement and then engineered materials is doing shielding and sealing. The shielding is helping to protect the wafer from electromagnetic static issues, which would destroy the chips. So we are essential to the digital supply chain in this supply chain and related technologies and markets around digital. If you combine that, it will be part of four major secular trends for the company, driving long-term growth. That would be aerospace, ESG, electrification and digitization.

So if you go to Slide seven. Speaking of the breadth of technologies, these eight motion control technologies, 2/3 as you heard me talk about in the past of our revenue come from customers who buy four more of these technologies. So again, it speaks to the interconnectedness of the technologies, the value proposition of the system and subsystem work that we do. But then coincidentally, 2/3 of our portfolio is also helping to enable our customers with our clean technology journey. And that 2/3 is going to continue to evolve to virtually 100% over time. I'll give you a classic example. The seal work that we do today on a combustion engine for transmissions or for piston seals, eventually gets replaced for seals, promoters and batteries in electric vehicles. So the takeaway on the bottom here is really our brand promise, helping our customers increase their productivity and their profitability. And we do that really in two ways. It's that interconnected tissue, the value proposition that we offer. And we're going to be a big part of helping our customers on their sustainability journeys we help with our claim technologies.

Going to the next slide, Slide eight, one of our favorite slides. It's going to -- you wanted to know whether Parker is really different or not, a picture's worth a thousand words. On the left-hand side is the EPS trend. We've updated that now for our current guidance for FY '22. And you can see that's virtually a 45-degree angle there, tremendous amount of year-over-year improvement, and 2.5 times EPS growth from the $7 that we were doing in FY '16. Then on the right-hand side is EBITDA margin. Again, you can see an almost 45-degree angle to that trajectory. And while we don't guide on EBITDA margin, our performance in the actual quarter we just completed for EBITDA margin was 22.1%. So you can see that we'll continue to show the expansion we're doing on margins. So the question might be how, and how is really in the header there, it's in our people, their engagement, the ownership that they're taking, the portfolio changes that we made and then the strategic changes, Win Strategy 2.0 and now most recently at 3.0.

If you go to Slide nine, just a quick update on the Meggitt transaction. We had a very strongly favorable shareholder vote. We're working with the U.K. government on both economic and national security views, they're underway. The antitrust and FDA filings are proceeding as planned, and we still anticipate a Q3 calendar 2022 close. And this is what we described before is a really compelling combination. It's going to double the size of our aerospace business. And when you couple this with the other acquisitions we've done, CLARCOR, LORD, Exotic and now Meggitt, our portfolio is now much more long cycle, less cyclical and faster growing.

And with that, I'll hand it over to Todd for more details on the quarter.

Todd M. Leombruno -- Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Okay. Thank you, Tom. I'll ask you to go to Slide 11. I know Tom mentioned a number of these numbers, so I'll try to move quick. The quarter was fantastic, right? seven records. Sales are up almost 17% versus prior year. We finished at $3.8 billion in sales. Organic sales are roughly 16%. It's almost all of the total, and currency had a small favorable impact of less than 1%. The growth this quarter was really driven across the board, strong broad-based demand across all of our industrial businesses and really a rebound in the commercial aerospace market, so we were happy to see that. And as Tom mentioned, we continue to benefit from strong growth from those recent portfolio additions we did in CLARCOR and LORD and Exotic. Both segment operating margins and adjusted EBITDA margins expanded by 210 basis points from prior year. We're really proud of that number. That adjusted segment operating margin came in at 22% and really just another strong quarter of margin performance.

Really proud of our teams, not only responding to the increased demand, but also executing through a number of various well-documented supply chain challenges. And I want to give them credit, there was a great effort to maintain costs in the quarter, and you can see that in our results. Incrementals are 35% year-over-year, which is really impressive. But even more impressive considering last year we had $125 million of discretionary savings really based on the actions we took during the pandemic. So if you account for that, the difference in incrementals would be 58%. So we're very proud of those results. If you look at net income, adjusted net income and adjusted EPS, both of those numbers increased by 40% versus prior year. Adjusted net income is $557 million, that's a 14.8% return on sales. And adjusted EPS were $4.26, that's a $1.21 increase from prior year where we finished at $3.05.

If you jump to Slide 12, this is really just that breakdown of the $1.21 increase in adjusted EPS. And really, the story here is just very strong, solid operating performance across every segment. Adjusted segment operating income increased by $184 million or almost 30% from prior year. That really is the first leg in this bridge that's $1.10 or 91% of the increase in earnings per share. All the other items netted to another $0.11 of favorable items and interest expense. Other expense and tax were all favorable and that helped us to offset just a slightly higher corporate G&A that was really based on some of those temporary savings we took action with last year.

If you go to Slide 13, just looking at the segment, really, the takeaway on this page is every segment generated record margins in the quarter. The other big thing I want to note is we were able -- we've always talked about trying to maintain our neutral price cost position. We were able to do that in the quarter across all the segments. And I already mentioned incrementals already, but I think it really highlights our efforts on covering inflation costs and really managing through the supply chain inefficiencies. So 35% is the MROS, but 58% if you exclude those discretionary savings. And demand continues to be very robust. Orders for the total company are up 26% from prior year. Just diving into the segments really quickly. Diversified Industrial North America, sales were $1.8 billion, that's up 17% from prior year. Adjusted operating margins did improve by 30 basis points from prior year and finished at 21.3%, really sound performance in that segment, considering it's pretty clear that the supply chain challenges are more difficult in the North American region. Order rates also very healthy at 32% positive, and it's really just continuing to show a strong rebound off of those prior year comps.

If I look at our international businesses and Diversified Industrial International, great quarter here for that team. even higher organic growth, 21% organic growth. Their sales came in just under $1.4 billion, and adjusted operating margins, significant expansion, 360 basis points improvement from prior year, and they did reach 22.8%. Very proud of that team. Volume obviously was a big driver here. But also, we've talked about this before, our focus on international distribution that helped our mix. That continues to expand and really some disciplined price/cost management across that segment, very important drivers for the quarter. And order rates also very strong at 25% plus prior year. If we move to Aerospace Systems, fantastic quarter from that team, sales were almost $600 million. Organic sales did turn positive for the segment, 3.4%, but it did turn positive. And we were very pleased to see that commercial markets are trending up. And notably, commercial aftermarket came in very strong at 33% over prior year. So it's glad to see some rebound in those markets.

Operating margin is a great story here, 400 basis points improvement. That segment came in at 22.1%. And I just want to note, it's really nice to see that level of performance. We are still well below pre-COVID volume level, so there is room to grow here as that volume returns. So we're looking forward to see that as well. And order rates turned positive, plus 16%, that is on a 12-month rolling basis. But if you remember last quarter, it was minus 7%, so we did see an inflection to positive orders in the Aerospace segment. And that's really just further proof of a slow but steady recovery in that segment. So really thanks to all of our global team, very great execution and really just continuing to live up to our purpose and perform extremely well.

If I ask you to go to Slide 14, this is just -- I'll touch on cash flow. Cash flow from operations was $424 million or 11.3% of sales. Free cash flow was $376 million or 10% of sales, and our conversion for the quarter was 83%. So I just want everyone to know, working capital management continues to be a very strong story here. We continue to tightly manage this. And really, we're just responding to the inflection in growth here. That increased level of demand, coupled with really our efforts to provide continuity of supply for our customers drove working capital to be a use of cash in the quarter. It accounted to be a 3.6% use of cash in the quarter. And if you just look at that compared to prior year. Prior year, we were in the second quarter of a significant downturn. Today, we're in the second quarter of a significant upturn. Last year, working capital was 6.1% source of cash last year. But just importantly, I want to be clear on this, for the full year, we are forecasting mid-teens cash flow from operations and our free cash flow will be well over 100%. So you'll see that strong cash flow performance for us as we go throughout the year.

On Slide 15, just really a quick update on capital deployment. I think everyone saw this, but last week, our Board approved a dividend payout of $1.03 per share. That is our 286th consecutive quarterly dividend. And that payout is in line with our announced target of 30% to 35% of five-year average net income. And on share repurchases, we did purchase $50 million in the quarter through our 10b5-1 program but we also deployed an additional $180 million to purchase shares on a discretionary basis. And essentially, what that does is that discretionary purchase makes up for the three quarters that we paused the 10b5-1 program, from FY '20 Q4 through FY '21 Q2. And our goal there is to eliminate dilution in FY '22. And then I just want to give a final update on the Meggitt financing.

In the quarter, we did secure a $2 billion deferred draw term loan. That, together with a $215 million cash deposit into escrow positioned us to take down our initial bridge facility. So that was successful. And then I want to be clear here, in October, after the quarter end, we also deposited another $2.3 billion into escrow from a combination of proceeds from commercial paper issuance and also some cash on hand, and that really allowed us to further reduce that bridge to GBP3.2 billion. Lastly, on Meggitt financing, we did complete a deal contingent forward hedge contract in the amount of $6.4 billion, and that really was just to lock in our pound to dollar rate as we continue to work through financing on the Meggitt acquisition. So great work by the team there.

If I go to Slide 16, just looking at guidance, obviously, you saw we increased our guidance this morning. As usual, we're going to give this to you on an as-reported and an adjusted basis. The sales range now for the year is approximately 6% to 9% or just under 8% at the midpoint. The breakdown of that is really all organic. It's 8.4% organic growth. We do expect currency to turn on us in Q3 through Q4, and that will create just a minimal drag, about 0.5 point to top line sales. And obviously, that's going to impact the international segment. There is no impact from acquisitions. We still do not expect Meggitt in our fiscal year. We're targeting Q3 of calendar year 2022, but we have no impact from Meggitt acquisition sales or segment operating income. And the split on sales is 48% first half, 52% second half. If you move down to segment operating margins, we did increase our adjusted segment operating margin forecast for the full year by 30 basis points from our prior guide, and that full year now gets us to 21.9% at the midpoint.

There is a range of 20 basis points on either side of that. And segment operating margin is split 47% first half, 53% in the second half. No change to adjustments at a pre-tax level, so you see all those numbers, those are exactly the same that we guided last quarter. And in corporate G&A and other expense, we expect that to now be $513 million on an as-reported basis and $461 million on an adjusted basis. Really, the only difference there is some transaction-related costs with the Meggitt acquisition. And just a reminder, we will continue to adjust transactional-related expenses as they are incurred until we get through all of those transactions. No change to the tax rate. We expect that to be 23%. And our EPS guidance on an adjusted basis is now $17.30 at the midpoint. We did narrow the range a little bit, $0.35 on either side of that. And the first half, second half split is 46% first half, 52% -- or excuse me, 54%, second half. And then finally, I'll just say for Q2 we are expecting adjusted EPS to be $3.74 at the midpoint. So that's just a real brief summary of the quarter.

With that, I will turn it back over to you, Tom.

Thomas L. Williams -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

Thank you, Todd. And I think the portfolio kind of sums up our thoughts. A big thank you to the global team and a highly engaged team delivering outstanding performance, and couple that with what is very bright future, propelled by the Win Strategy 3.0 and our strategic long-cycle acquisitions as part of our capital deployment strategy.

With that, Todd has a quick comment that he wants to make about logistics before we start the Q&A.

Todd M. Leombruno -- Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Yes. Just one comment before we start the Q&A portion of the call, we'd like to respond to as many analysts as we can today on the call. So if you could ask one question, a follow-up, if necessary, and then jump back in the queue, it would be appreciated.

So with that, Rachel, I'll turn it back over to you, and we can start the Q&A session.

Questions and Answers:

Operator

[Operator Instructions] Your first question comes from the line of Mig Dobre from Baird.

Mig Dobre -- Baird -- Analyst

Good morning, Mig. Good morning, everyone. Yes. Congrats on a very strong quarter. Tom, I guess where I was thinking we'd start, you highlighted big trends that benefit your business, right, aerospace, ESG, electrification, digitization. I guess the first one, aerospace is perhaps the clearest to observe. But I'm curious, the other three, can you give us some context in terms of how all this plays into your business? How is it driving incremental growth? And more importantly, are all these items driven by sort of new product introduction from Parker? Or is this sort of using the existing solutions that you have in new ways that are helping your customer achieve these goals?

Thomas L. Williams -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

Thank you, Mig. I appreciate you picked up on that comment during my opening comments. But, yes, so what I would characterize these are secular trends that feel longer than a normal business cycle. ESG is going to take decades to unfold. Electrification really being kind of a subset of that and digitization continues to just transform how we interface with each other and how we interface with the supply chain. So these are things that I view as being bigger, longer than a typical business cycle. For us, it's going to be a combination of infrastructure. So the infrastructure that goes around the world to put these in place, things that are also onboard equipment. And both of these are bill of material-plus type of additions for us. And then also the fact that they should be faster growing environments as a result of. We are doing innovation in this space. But a lot of our portfolio today, which is what I mentioned on that one slide, 2/3 of it today is already clean technology related.

Yes, we're adding some motors and motor controllers and software in addition to our current portfolio, but our current portfolio was already designed to be very energy-source agnostic and be able to respond to these changing dynamics. We'll try to give a little more context on this at the Investor Day. We just started before the call to try to, in the last couple of days, quantify digital and the threat that it cuts through the company and it's surprisingly large, and we'll give you more context on that with some actual numbers when we get to Investor Day. But it has an opportunity, you think of the company as being very diverse and probably no end markets outside of aerospace being bigger than 5% or 6%. Digital is a threat that cuts through so many. It's going to be probably second to aerospace, the biggest threat that cuts through the company. And ESG is unfolding for the next 20, 30 years, as the world tries to get to carbon neutrality. So that's what I like. You've got a prior environment, thinking on lease in my watch, seven years, two industrial recessions and a pandemic, I think we're facing a much more constructive environment going forward.

Mig Dobre -- Baird -- Analyst

Understood. Then my follow-up is on international, which, frankly, performed quite a bit better than I guessed. Two questions here. One is on the margin side, in terms of incrementals and maybe some things that might have been unique that helped the quarter. I don't know if there's anything to call out. And on the order front, I'm curious as to how you're seeing the various regions develop, China, in particular. I know that geography punch is maybe above its weight from a profitability and margin standpoint, so what are you seeing there? And what's the impact on a go-forward basis in terms of mix? Thank you.

Thomas L. Williams -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

So maybe I'll start with that, Mig, of course, this is Tom. On the orders, they were strong throughout the quarter. And to help people, it's easier to look at it from a dollar value basis. The dollar value was fairly consistent with what we saw in the prior quarters. So we had nice consistency. The numbers in the 26% improvement went down from all the way from mid-50s just because the prior periods was improving. But we saw all regions strong. Internationally, all three of the international regions were pretty much the same. We reported international 25, but all three reasons underneath there were pretty much plus and minus 25%, give or take some change.

On the margin side, I would say there was nothing in particular that is different other than what we've been doing all along, which was Win Strategy 2.0 and 3.0 and a rapid resizing of the company post pandemic and then being very careful as we moved into a higher demand of feathering cost in a very judicious type of fashion, and a much more lean and natural fashion we've had ever before because our cost structure is so much better. I do think international has less supply chain disruptions in North America for sure. And you see that reflected in MROS.

Mig Dobre -- Baird -- Analyst

Thank you.

Thomas L. Williams -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

I appreciate it, Mig.

Operator

Your next question comes from the line of Jeff Sprague from Vertical Research.

Jeff Sprague -- Vertical Research -- Analyst

Hi. Thank you. Good morning, everyone.

Thomas L. Williams -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

Good morning, Jeff.

Jeff Sprague -- Vertical Research -- Analyst

Good morning. Tom, I was wondering if you could address a little bit what's going on with your OE customers. The nature of my question is, I thought it would be apparent maybe in the quarter that there would be some more pressures there. I'm sure there were some sales slippage and the like, but it doesn't jump off the page in the numbers, so to speak. So maybe just a little color on what's going on with the OEs? The shape of their inventory? And just your visibility into the remainder of the year?

Thomas L. Williams -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

Yes, Jeff. So it's Tom. So I want to touch on customers and then a little bit about us because what you're referring to is really supply chain issues. And those will be the two fronts that it touches, obviously. With our customers, I would say the supply chain has been much more acute and a bigger of an issue versus our own supply chain. What we've seen with orders from customers is a much more longer period duration, staggered release dates, trying to make sure they have a spot in line, so to speak. We've had pushouts on delivery acceptance. So you may have a date as due and due to other challenges they have as far as supply chain with other suppliers, they may not necessarily want that delivery, which we fully understand.

They don't want to sit on all this inventory. So there's been temporary idling of plants and this isn't really tied to the OEs, but you've got the rolling energy shutdowns that we've had and been experiencing in China, which will continue, I think, pretty much all the way to the Olympics. We've done pretty well through all that. If I had to use round numbers, it's probably a $50 million to $75 million impact as far as the OE customers fueling supply chain things that tethered it to us. I think overall demand with them continues to be strong. It's more just sliding to the right and then trying to manage a more complex supply chain. Their inventory, they've always been just in time and they're being very careful to not accept other inventory that they don't need that they can't put together with holes that they might have in their bill of material.

Jeff Sprague -- Vertical Research -- Analyst

Great. No, thanks for that. That's very interesting. And then on price cost, it is quite an achievement to not only get to dollar neutrality, but margin rate neutrality. But I wonder if you could just give us a ballpark number of the actual realized price on a year-over-year basis that you're running at, your nominal price?

Lee C. Banks -- Vice Chairman and President

Jeff, it's Lee. I can't give you an actual number, but I'll tell you, the margin neutrality is a lot of hard work by everybody in the company. And I think it shouldn't be a surprise. We've had two processes embedded in our Win Strategy for going on 20 years, and that's around pricing, and it's around supply chain. And those processes give us very accurate indices around our selling price index and our purchase price index. So what it does is it aligns the whole company, and it gives us a way to roll things up about what we need to do going forward. And what you're seeing are the benefits of those processes really embedded in the company and institutionalized.

Jeff Sprague -- Vertical Research -- Analyst

Great. Thanks. I'll leave it there. Take care.

Lee C. Banks -- Vice Chairman and President

Okay Thanks.

Operator

The next question comes from the line of Scott Davis from Melius Research.

Scott Davis -- Melius Research. -- Analyst

Hi. Good morning, guys.

Thomas L. Williams -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

Good morning, Scott, hope you're well.

Scott Davis -- Melius Research. -- Analyst

Well, great results from you guys, make our lives a little easier. So thanks for that. But on -- now that we've had a little bit of time, it's not post-COVID yet, but a little bit of time. Can we take stock of LORD and Exotic, kind of where they are versus the deal models? And I imagine perhaps maybe not quite on the top line at your deal model, but perhaps better on the margin line. But I'm just guessing. Some color there would be helpful.

Thomas L. Williams -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

Yes, Scott, it's Tom. We cannot be happier with both of these transactions. Lord has proven to be more resilient and faster growing than legacy Parker and that's what we had hoped for. Its margins are beating what we had expected and that this kind of cash flow that we review with the Board. It's performing in that upper 20s EBITDA. So it's accretive on growth. It's accretive on margins, it's accretive on cash flow and is exposed to more longer cycle businesses. Exotic has performed remarkably well. Remember, when we bought Exotic, nobody would have anticipated 737 MAX being grounded for as long as it was. And even with that, strength of their portfolio and that team, we put a mid-20s EBITDA. So it's a little light on the top line, mainly because of two things, the MAX grounding and the pandemic, but its margins have held up very consistent with what we had approved for the port. And we know we're at the beginning of a long cycle improvement there with Exotic. The aerospace traffic is going to come back. and the MAX ramp-up is coming back. So we've gotten through the worst of it, and it's going to be quite an exciting transaction for us.

Scott Davis -- Melius Research. -- Analyst

Sounds good.

Todd M. Leombruno -- Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

CLARCOR has been obviously a few years, but that business is also exceeding our expectations from the model standpoint. So a lot of hard work across the team. and that is flowing through in all those numbers that we just talked about, they're a big piece of that as well. So I didn't want to lose sight of that.

Scott Davis -- Melius Research. -- Analyst

Yes. That was a great deal. But moving on to -- I love your Slide six, the semiconductor example. But how do you -- can you go to market as one Parker when you're looking at content into a semi fab?

Thomas L. Williams -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

We do. We have account managers that cover certain accounts, and they're representing and looking at the entire business. And that's how we -- so we're organized operationally around technologies, but our commercial teams are organized around channels to market, either global OEMs, national OEMs or distribution. And so it's that account management team that brings power or partner to the customers. Or if we go through our channel partners, it's our distributors that are bringing the power to Parker and bringing a comprehensive offering together.

Scott Davis -- Melius Research. -- Analyst

Okay. Encouraging. Good luck on the rest of the year, guys. Thank you.

Thomas L. Williams -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

Thanks, Scott.

Operator

The next question comes from the line of Ann Duignan from JPMorgan.

Ann Duignan -- JPMorgan -- Analyst

Hi. Good morning. Ann Duignan here after 20 years. Maybe first on your guidance for fiscal Q2, you're guiding to $374 million at the midpoint and consensus is at $386 million. Can you talk about where you think the biggest disconnect is between our sell-side buddies and what you're guiding to? Where should we be most focused on? Where do we need to review?

Thomas L. Williams -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

Yes. And it's Tom. I would say it's probably at the top line. So what we tried to do with Q2, you saw that we raised the organic guide for the full year from 7% to 8.5%, and that was primarily by raising the second half. Our second half in the prior guide was 4.5% and the new guide is 6%. But we left Q2 basically as the same. And that's really based on what we saw. In Q1 and in particular, in October around just supply chain challenges, more around what I was talking about with Jeff, around our customer demand and kind of the uncertainties or difficulty in predicting delivery dates and time on this on that. You also have -- if you just look at the raw dollars, the dollars flow very much proportionally from Q1 to Q2. So normally, we would have less workdays, which is what we have in North America, typically, if you look at over the last 20 years. Our Q2 is typically 4% lighter in Q1. International is typically 1% lighter.

We lowered North America here more. It's not minus 5% from a dollar standpoint versus Q1, mainly because of that extra 100 bps of supply chain uncertainties. And part of what we're looking at is those temporary idling that customers have been doing. And in particular, while we haven't had any customers announcing yet, you've got the holidays, and if you -- it would be very easy for them just to extend a day or a half day of those type of things. And so we're just trying to be pragmatic as to what Q2 would look like given natural progression from Q1 to Q2, putting on a little bit of supply chain. And so I think the difference would be in the top line because the incrementals for Q2. If you look at it on apples-to-apples, again, taking out the discretionary basis that we had in prior Q2, it's another upper 50s, just like Q1. So if you look at the operational excellence, upper 50s incrementals is pretty hard to beat. And so really, the only difference you could have is top line assumptions that give you the context of how we came up with our Q2.

Ann Duignan -- JPMorgan -- Analyst

Very helpful. And I guess if I'd had time to back into all your first half, back half, I would have figured that out. So I appreciate you taking the time to give us that color. Just as a follow-up then, if I look at your sales in Diversified Industrial North America, up 19% versus orders up 32%, which suggests that your lead times are extending. A, can you just confirm that? And B, is that what gives you confidence in the back half revenues? Or is there still some uncertainty. I mean you're not known for having long lead times, so they have confidence in the back half and make no change to your revenue outlook for half two. Is some of that back half contingent on all of these supply chains getting better through the course of Q2 and off to the races thereafter? Or is there still some lack of visibility for back half for you guys? And I'll leave it there. Thanks.

Thomas L. Williams -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

Yes, Ann, it's Tom again. So yes, we don't always have complete visibility, but our backlog is increasing sequentially. North America went up 14%, international went up 6%. So that's part of it. We're also just recognizing that the second half, we don't see necessarily significant improvement from supply chain. We think you'll get a little bit. Most of the supply chain improvements will be more so into our FY '23. We have not been impacted a lot of that. But I think the difference you're seeing between orders and organic growth is what I was referring to earlier as customers putting in orders and having it be over multi-quarter release dates. Whereas in the past, they would give us orders that were much shorter cycle. These are longer cycle by industrial standards with release dates over multiple quarters.

Ann Duignan -- JPMorgan -- Analyst

Okay. That's helpful color. I appreciate that. Thank you. I'll get back in queue.

Thomas L. Williams -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

Thanks, Ann.

Operator

Your next question comes from the line of David Raso from Evercore.

David Raso -- Evercore -- Analyst

Hi. Thank you. Obviously, I've been covering the company for some years and the international margins have really been impressive, now running ahead of North America. And part of it really maybe has been supply chain issues are a little more acute in North America. But can you help us better understand how we should think about that notable improvement in international margins? Be it geographic, be it obviously building out more Parker stores, whatever may be bigger distribution there? Just trying to understand, so when we think about you say the upcoming March meeting and we think about margin improvement from here, it just was a major issue years ago about can international get close or equal North America. And now it's been many quarters in a row, it's running ahead. And I'm just curious about the drivers and how to think about that going forward. Thank you.

Thomas L. Williams -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

Yes, David, it's Tom. We could not be happier obviously, because this has been something the company has been working on for a long time, long time on international margins. So I would say it started a while even before the changes to the Win Strategy, at least on my watch. It started with our team working very hard to change the cost structure in all international, in particular in EMEA. And just recognizing that all those different countries and different infrastructures, there was an opportunity to try to simplify that. So that's been going on for multiple years, having a more agile, lower cost structure, than a concerted effort to grow international distribution from where we started at 35%, a 35-65 split now up to 40, and we'll give you the latest when we get to Investor Day, but it's north of 40 now, so you're getting some mix out there. We've had -- Asia has always historically been a very strong performer.

We really kind of set that region up if we think -- if you think about over the last 30 years, we set that region up the latest. And so we took all the best practices we had from everywhere around the world, when we set that region up from a cost structure standpoint. But what's helped us a lot in the last couple of years is, is the Europe team and Latin America, Latin America being small for us, but both of those teams have made a marked improvement. And when we think going forward to your other part of your question, David, we see no reason why they can't continue, we'll give you new targets when we get to March. But you see right now our full year guide, basically North America, international margins converging. We had always hoped that they're basically the same. And so going forward, we don't see any reason why they can't be. And they both have equal opportunity to grow to higher levels, and we'll give you that vision in March.

David Raso -- Evercore -- Analyst

And a quick follow-up. The back half of the year, fiscally speaking, your revenue is only up 4%, and I have to believe pricing is running probably at least that. So the idea of volume being essentially flat or down in the back half of the year, is that simply a conservatism around the supply chain? Or just trying to understand why volumes won't be able to grow in the back half?

Thomas L. Williams -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

So just for clarification, David, the back half organic is 6%. You have about a 1% currency headwind. So probably nets to around 5%. And there is some -- we're being, what I mentioned earlier, pragmatic about the uncertainties on supply chain more so on our customers. But then we're not immune. We have some of our own challenges, but I think our team has done a particular job weathering it. And probably the best evidence of our ability to weather supply chain is just our ability of the MROS. Because if you're struggling with your supply chain issues it ultimately shows up in your marginal return on sales. But that's how I characterize the second half.

David Raso -- Evercore -- Analyst

All right. Thank you very much.

Thomas L. Williams -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

Thanks for your questions, David.

Operator

The next question comes from the line of Nathan Jones from Stifel.

Nathan Jones -- Stifel -- Analyst

Good morning, everyone.

Thomas L. Williams -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

Good morning, Nathan.

Nathan Jones -- Stifel -- Analyst

Parker has over the years continued to move toward and has always maintained a kind of local for logical sourcing and manufacturing structure. Has that given you guys better supply chain here that's allowed you to pick up any market share versus competitors who might have longer supply chains? And do you think that, that market share gain will be sticky or transient once supply chain normalize?

Lee C. Banks -- Vice Chairman and President

Yes. Nathan, it's Lee. Just maybe I'll talk to the first part, you're right. Our strategy always has been to build and source local, which has been incredibly helpful. And I think the other thing that's kind of benefited us through these disruptions. We worked hard on dual-sourcing strategy where appropriate, which has given us some flexibility. And one of the things that kind of weaved itself into this are simple by design efforts in some key areas where it's been easier for us to do material substitutions than we've done in the past. So all that together is really -- I'm not saying we're immune, but has made us to be able to work though these supply chain disruptions. I would say the market share that we pick up is very sticky. One, you're talking about a lot of engineered products. So I mean, when people take the effort to engineer the product in, it's not something that you quickly change. And two, the reality is if we're taking on new business, we're looking for commitments on both -- from both of us to be committed to the volume going forward. And that -- to that standpoint, I think it's sticky going forward.

Nathan Jones -- Stifel -- Analyst

Thanks. And my follow-up, Tom, was to one of your comments where you talked about customers giving you, I guess, orders over multiple quarters rather than maybe orders over just one quarter. Does that have a meaningful impact on the order rates in the quarter, you've just reported first quarter of '22? And should we expect that to have maybe a little bit of a negative impact on the order rates as we go forward with that increased visibility that customers are giving you at the moment? Or is it not a significant amount?

Thomas L. Williams -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

Nathan, it's Tom. It's hard to quantify. If you take the orders and try to somehow dissect and separate all those that are multi-quarters. I'd hazard just a guess, I don't think it's material. It's just a -- it's different as far as in the past, at least in industrial and normal business conditions, say, normal supply chains, normal order entry patterns, you had a fairly consistent input output quarter-to-quarter, maybe a little bit going into the next quarter. This is clearly more over multi-quarters. And actually, it's good. It's customers trying to plan for longer, trying to make sure they get their ticket in line in a way that helps us from a planning standpoint. So when things do stabilize, if they continue that way, I think that's a good thing for scheduling them. Our factors and schedule our supply chain.

Nathan Jones -- Stifel -- Analyst

Great. Thanks for taking my questions.

Operator

The next question comes from the line of Nigel Coe from Wolfe Research.

Nigel Coe -- Wolfe Research -- Analyst

Thanks. Good morning. Thanks for the questions. So aerospace, so I wonder if we could maybe unpack the aero performance a little bit and maybe focus a little bit more on military because that's been an area where we've seen, especially in the ops markets, some noise from some of your competitors in defense. And I'm just curious how you see military over the next fiscal year compared to your prior expectations.

Thomas L. Williams -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

Yes. Nigel, it's Tom. So military OEM, and that's one we mentioned in the last call. We do see that being slightly soft, kind of mid-single digits decline. And that's primarily because of the repositioning that our customers, thankfully, did to try to strengthen the supply chain and protect the supply chain. They were in the pandemic, they didn't want people to go under. And so they kind of pulled forward demand into last fiscal year, leading this fiscal year lighter as you're adjusting inventory. So that should come back into FY '23 and beyond. And I would see that being a low to mid-single digits, probably more toward the low single-digit growth on the military OE side. And then on military MRO, we had some softness in the quarter. We're still forecasting mid-single digits positive for the full year. So the only weakness that we're really experiencing for the full year would be the military OEM based on the supply chain things I mentioned.

Nigel Coe -- Wolfe Research -- Analyst

Okay. That's great. Thanks, Tom. And then you raised your margin by one point at the midpoint for aerospace. I think the revenue number stayed unchanged. So just curious what's changed since you gave guidance back in August?

Thomas L. Williams -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

Well, the aerospace team is doing a fantastic job. There's a couple of factors, Nigel. It's Tom again. First of all, a nice commercial MRO uptick. So Todd mentioned that commercial MRO up 33% for the quarter. And order entry on 312 was over 70%. So you're starting to see that replenishment of commercial aftermarket, which is of the four elements, the highest margin that we would have. And then within that kind of favorable mix -- within that favorable mix, the spare to repair mix was favorable. So at the beginning, which is typical when customers are trying to maintain assets and minimize cost, they'll do more repair work. And then once that's kind of exhausted and they had to put back in spares.

We've seen an uptick in spare activity. And then the aerospace team has done a great job. If you go back to the beginning of pandemic, we moved very aggressively at the beginning to resize the business for the long cycle. And what's really remarkable here is we're going to put these margins we're putting up to guide at 20.9% will be higher than our previous all-time high pre-COVID. And so this business is not even at 80% volume of COVID and is putting up margins that are higher than the best we've ever done pre-COVID. It's just a fantastic job. And to your point, Nigel, if you were to go compare that aerospace performance against other aerospace peers, I think we would do quite well with that.

Nigel Coe -- Wolfe Research -- Analyst

I was about to raise a question of whether you can get mid-20s longer term but I think we'll leave that one for March. But thanks, Tom. Great color.

Thomas L. Williams -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

Thanks, Nigel.Take care.

Operator

The next question comes from the line of Stephen Volkmann from Jefferies.

Thomas L. Williams -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

Good morning, Steve.

Stephen Volkmann -- Jefferies -- Analyst

Hi. Good morning, guys. Thanks for fitting me in. You mentioned, Tom, I think that your OE customers were sort of delaying some of their deliveries, certainly understandable. But what do you see in the distribution side? Are inventories also really low there? And would they rather be building them a little if they could.

Thomas L. Williams -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

Absolutely. Steve, it's Tom. Lee -- I can let Lee chime in if he has anything extra. Our distributors are finding the same challenges. When you talk to them, they would love to be building inventory. This would be a strategic use of cash for them if they could, but they're having a hard time, really all their suppliers getting up to where they'd like them to be. So they're pretty much running hand about. And so that -- when I think about the longer-term opportunities for us on growth here, you've got the pent-up demand and kind of the reflex of COVID bottom. But there'll be an inventory replenishment back to normal levels for distribution, which will be -- will help us. And if you go out longer than that, you've got capex reinvestment. two things, they are under investment, and I think this whole localization has a giant burner underneath it now because of this lack of product availability is going to drive customers and suppliers to add capacity and to create dual capacity, which is infrastructure opportunities for us, ESG and then just capital deployment. So I think there's a long-term secular growth trajectory. But to get to your more near-term question, yes, the distributors are in desperate need of more material, and we're doing everything we can to get it to them.

Stephen Volkmann -- Jefferies -- Analyst

Okay. Great. And maybe just my quick follow-up. You guys obviously did much better this quarter than I think most of us expected. And I think maybe than you even expected. And yet for most of our companies, things actually deteriorated through the quarter. So I guess I'm just curious really what changed for you from three months ago that allowed you to kind of come in with such a strong result?

Thomas L. Williams -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

Well, I think three months ago, we were doing an annual guide, so we were careful with the annual guide, again, it's Tom, as to getting too far over our skis. We tried to factor in an element of uncertainties with supply chain because we were experiencing them already when we did the August guide. I think we weathered the supply chain issues better than we anticipated, allow us to generate higher organic growth. And then the operating margins are, I think, indicative of really multiple years of effort. It's a combination of Win 2.0, Win 3.0, the capital deployment buying, buying companies that are accretive on margins and cash and growth. So it's not an overnight sensation. It's really -- you go to that one slide that shows the EBITDA trend. It's been building on and the pace of that improvement on top of some very quick cost actions that we did in the pandemic. And thankfully, not a lot of those costs have come back, we've been able to run the business differently in a more digital fashion, which has clearly helped us on some of those variable costs.

Stephen Volkmann -- Jefferies -- Analyst

Great. Thank you, guys.

Thomas L. Williams -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

Thanks, Steve. Rachel, I think we have time for at least one more question so would you please take who's next in line.

Operator

Sure. The next question comes from the line of Jeff Hammond from KeyBanc Capital Markets.

Jeff Hammond -- KeyBanc Capital Markets -- Analyst

Hi. Good morning, guys.

Thomas L. Williams -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

Good morning, Jeff.

Jeff Hammond -- KeyBanc Capital Markets -- Analyst

I appreciate you fitting me in. I know you can't say much on the Meggitt deal, but I guess I just want to understand if like in your -- from your perspective, if the review process or the gating factors around getting the deal closed or the timing has changed in any way?

Thomas L. Williams -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

Jeff, it's Tom. No, not at all. We're on schedule. We always kind of anticipated third quarter next calendar year. The reviews we're doing with the government on economic and national security will conclude well before that. And then really, the pacing item will be just the antitrust and FDI filings, which are pursuing as planned, but you just can't predict. Every country has a different process and timing. And it's difficult to project that outcome. So that's our best guess, and everything is on schedule.

Jeff Hammond -- KeyBanc Capital Markets -- Analyst

Okay. Great. And then, Tom, I like the slide on clean tech as well, 2/3 of the product enabling clean tech. But I'm just wondering if you have a sense of what you think your revenue mix is today to clean tech or ESG markets? And what you think that might look like three to five years out?

Thomas L. Williams -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

Jeff, it's Tom again. So it's basically -- it's 2/3 numbers. That's how we came up with it. 2/3 our revenue today would be supporting intent. I would argue, everything we do support sustainability, even if you take, say, engine on mobile filtration that we'd be doing for heavy-duty trucks is helping that fuel run more efficiently and better emissions. So even today, we just try to be very conservative in that number, recognizing that, that was still a fossil fuel-related technology. But it's going to morph into a 100% of the portfolio because everything -- if you take construction equipment or forestry equipment as it moves to more electric, all you're really doing is changing the power source, going from say precipitating diesel engine to hydrogen engine or fuel cell or a battery or some combination thereof.

And all of our technologies are still needed to facilitate the work functions and the propel functions. And if anything, like I had mentioned before, our bill of material gets bigger because it was much more heat and you've got a management of all of our Engineered Materials technologies. We do have, I think, a bigger bill of material that we'll have with our Motion Technologies, if we had more motor content and more software, etc. So we're very excited. I came back to those secular trends for us, aerospace, ESG, electrification and digitization. I think you're going to see a different Parker if you look at for the next five...

Jeff Hammond -- KeyBanc Capital Markets -- Analyst

Okay. Thank you so much.

Todd M. Leombruno -- Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Thanks for the questions, Jeff. All right. I think that concludes our FY '22 Q1 earnings webcast. Thank you to everyone for joining us today. As usual, Robin and Jeff are going to be here for follow-ups if anyone needs any. And I wish everyone has a great remainder of the day. Thanks again.

Operator

[Operator closing remarks]

Duration: 58 minutes

Call participants:

Todd M. Leombruno -- Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Thomas L. Williams -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

Lee C. Banks -- Vice Chairman and President

Mig Dobre -- Baird -- Analyst

Jeff Sprague -- Vertical Research -- Analyst

Scott Davis -- Melius Research. -- Analyst

Ann Duignan -- JPMorgan -- Analyst

David Raso -- Evercore -- Analyst

Nathan Jones -- Stifel -- Analyst

Nigel Coe -- Wolfe Research -- Analyst

Stephen Volkmann -- Jefferies -- Analyst

Jeff Hammond -- KeyBanc Capital Markets -- Analyst

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