It's impossible to overstate how important the return of Twitter's (NYSE:TWTR) co-founder Jack Dorsey as permanent CEO is for the company. The social network is at a critical juncture in the development of its platform and long-term strategy, making its overall direction during the next five to 10 years highly dependent on the CEO's decisions during this period.

This is why investors should take the time to get to know him and where he wants to take the platform next.

Twitter co-founder and CEO Jack Dorsey. Image source: Twitter.

To this end, here are some new, golden tidbits from the company's conference call following the recent announcement. 

Twitter's priorities remain the same
Every since Dorsey took over as interim CEO about four months ago, he has emphasized three priorities for the company. "Disciplined execution, simplifying our service, and better communicating our value remain the same under [his] permanent CEO title," he said.

Furthermore, he explained that these priorities are already being translated into concrete actions. "The pace and quality of our product launches is up," he said.

He mentioned Twitter's recent launch of its Project Lighting, or Moments, as a good representation of its efforts to better communicate its value and to make the platform more instantly useful to new members.

Twitter Moments. Image source: Twitter.

"Bold plans" for 2016
"We're not done raising the bar in these areas," Dorsey said, referring to the company's aim for greater execution, a simpler service, and better communication of its value.

The product team has "bold plans" for 2016," he noted.

In a recent CNBC interview, Twitter co-founder and board member Evan Williams echoed Dorsey's reference to aggressive efforts to bring innovation quickly to the company. Innovation would be evident in "months," Williams said. "Not years, but not weeks."

Mass-market appeal
When asked during the conference call if Twitter will have to choose between focusing on "everyone" and its "most passionate users," Dorsey said, "I believe we should focus on both."

We've been reviewing our roadmaps to make sure we are making Twitter easier for everyone around the world. Currently, the product makes people do a lot of work for people to realize the value. And there's a lot of initiatives aimed a making sure that people can immediately get value out or Twitter. ... At the same time, we want to make sure that the folks that do use Twitter on a daily basis, who love it, we're building more utility to make Twitter even more powerful for them.

Retention and recruiting
Going forward, Dorsey thinks that a heightened emphasis on a focused and effective product road map, paired with excellent execution, will help the company retain talent and even attract new ones.

"Morale at Twitter is really strong, and we don't believe [this CEO announcement] is going to affect morale or attrition negatively. ... We actually think this is a pretty positive [for retention]. It adds a lot of clarity," he said.

And he plans to ramp up the company's efforts in attracting talent. He said, "[Our emphasis on execution of a high-quality and focused product roadmap] is the best tool for retaining talent. It's also the best tool for recruiting. ... We're going to make sure we put extra emphasis on continuing to recruit great people for the company."

Despite his split role as CEO of soon-to-be-public Square and Twitter, it's clear that Dorsey means business. His attention to execution and products aimed to appeal to both a larger audience and to its passionate users represents the sort of focus investors need from a Twitter CEO right now.

Looking ahead, investors should keep an eye on Twitter's early moves under Dorsey's leadership to get a better idea of how closely his actions reflect his words.

Daniel Sparks has no position in any stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool owns shares of and recommends Twitter. Try any of our Foolish newsletter services free for 30 days. We Fools may not all hold the same opinions, but we all believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.