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Bank of America's headquarters in Charlotte, North Carolina. Image source: iStock/Thinkstock.

If you're a shareholder of Bank of America (NYSE:BAC), wouldn't you like to know who else fancies its stock? Because I presume the answer is "yes," I created a brief slideshow (see below) revealing the $2.15 trillion bank's five biggest shareholders.

The list is a who's who of sophisticated investors, spanning an array of the biggest money managers in the world. The venerable asset manager BlackRock (NYSE:BLK) sits atop it, along with State Street (NYSE:STT) and Fidelity, among others. BlackRock alone holds 599.7 million shares of Bank of America stock worth $10.8 billion.

Perhaps what's most interesting about the list of Bank of America's biggest shareholders is the fact that Berkshire Hathaway (NYSE:BRK-A) (NYSE:BRK-B) isn't on it. Berkshire Hathaway invested $5 billion into Bank of America four years ago in exchange for $5 billion worth of preferred stock plus warrants to purchase 700 million shares of Bank of America common stock at an exercise price of $7.14 per share. Once exercised, the warrants will transform Berkshire Hathaway into the bank's biggest shareholder, exceeding BlackRock's stake by roughly 100 million shares.

To see who else did (and didn't) make the cut, simply scroll through the brief slideshow below -- a table with data follows it.

Bank of America's Biggest Investors

Number of Shares Owned

Value of Stake

Ownership Interest in Bank of America

BlackRock

599,692,793

$10.8 billion

5.71%

Vanguard

539,166,283

$9.7 billion

5.13%

State Street

426,865,279

$7.7 billion

4.06%

Fidelity

317,631,778

$5.7 billion

3.02%

Dodge & Cox

176,610,183

$3.2 billion

1.68%

Data source: Morningstar, Yahoo! Finance, author's calculations.

John Maxfield has no position in any stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool owns shares of and recommends Berkshire Hathaway. The Motley Fool recommends Bank of America. Try any of our Foolish newsletter services free for 30 days. We Fools may not all hold the same opinions, but we all believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.