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A branch of U.S. Bancorp.

A friend of mine once worked at a Portland, Oregon-based money manager that catered to, among other people, former longtime employees of U.S. Bancorp (NYSE:USB) who became wealthy holding its stock. This got me thinking about other investors that have benefited from the bank's ascent, leading me to draw up a list of U.S. Bancorp's five biggest shareholders, which you can find in the slideshow below.

The companies on the list own a combined 22% of U.S. Bancorp's outstanding common stock. While most of the slots are filled by institutional money managers such as Fidelity and Vanguard, the most interesting company to make the list is Warren Buffett's Berkshire Hathaway. I say that because Buffett has a particular knack for identifying the best-run banks in America, including Wells Fargo (NYSE:WFC) and M&T Bank (NYSE:MTB), among others.

This is good company to be in, as all three of these banks have outperformed the market over the past two decades. Since 1995, shares of Wells Fargo have soared by 1,540%, M&T Bank's by 1,310%, and U.S. Bancorp's by 734%. The story is the same if you go back further, as M&T Bank, Wells Fargo, and U.S. Bancorp are among the 5 best-performing bank stocks since 1983.

Without further ado, then, I encourage you to scroll through the brief slideshow below to discover all five of U.S. Bancorp's biggest shareholders -- a table with raw data follows it.

 

U.S. Bancorp's Biggest Investors

Number of Shares Owned

Value of Stake

Ownership Interest in U.S. Bancorp

Vanguard

94.1 million

$4.1 billion

5.31%

Fidelity

85.3 million

$3.7 billion

4.81%

Berkshire Hathaway

85.1 million

$3.7 billion

4.80%

State Street

71.7 million

$3.1 billion

4.04%

BlackRock

50.3 million

$2.2 billion

2.84%

Data source: Morningstar, Yahoo! Finance, author's calculations.

John Maxfield has no position in any stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool owns shares of and recommends Wells Fargo. The Motley Fool has the following options: short January 2016 $52 puts on Wells Fargo. Try any of our Foolish newsletter services free for 30 days. We Fools may not all hold the same opinions, but we all believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.