Though work doesn't have to be a popularity contest, it helps to be well-liked at the office. The more people who think highly of you, the better your chances of doing well and getting others to pitch in when you're in a jam. If your goal is to get your co-workers to like you, here are a few tactics you might employ.

1. Be humble

It's natural to want acknowledgement when your efforts result in some major team- or company-wide wins. But if you're modest about your successes, your co-workers will come to applaud you for them, as opposed to resenting you. Not only is it important to practice humility, but also be generous in giving others a piece of the glory. If, for example, your boss highlights your good work during a team meeting, be sure to accept that praise graciously but also jump in and mention the folks who assisted in your efforts.

Two men and a woman in professional dress stand in a circle and smile as they hold electronic devices, with the sun shining in through the glass wall behind them.

IMAGE SOURCE: GETTY IMAGES.

2. Offer a helping hand

It's easy enough to keep your head down at work and focus on the things you know you need to get done. But one of the simplest ways to ingratiate yourself with your co-workers is to be generous with your time. That means that if you see a colleague struggling and can take 10 minutes to put him out of his misery, do so. We all want to get ahead at work, but it'll serve your career even better if you come across a team player.

3. Know when to keep your mouth shut

While it's generally not a bad thing to have an opinion at work, there comes a point where you're better off staying quiet and letting things play out. For example, if two of your colleagues are in the midst of a heated debate over which approach to a project is most ideal, the last thing you want to do is take sides or offer up an alternative of your own. With the former, you'll tick off the person you don't agree with. With the latter, you'll risk angering both co-workers. Along these lines, resist the urge to always chime in with suggestions during team meetings or conversations. The last thing you want is to come off as a know-it-all, even if you're truly trying to be helpful.

4. Get to know your colleagues

Though your co-workers don't need to become your closest friends, that doesn't mean you shouldn't take the time to get to know them on a more personal level. If you limit yourself to nothing but small talk day in and day out, you'll risk coming across as uninterested and insincere. Instead, aim to learn more about your colleagues' interests, families, and talents, and incorporate those talking points into the occasional friendly conversation.

5. Acknowledge your own weaknesses

Nobody likes that perfect employee at the office who never gets tripped up or does anything wrong. That's why it pays to ask your co-workers for help on occasion -- even if you have the ability to troubleshoot the problem yourself. Remember, when you turn to others, it serves as an ego boost for them, and when they associate you with that feeling, it can instantly make them like you more.

6. Have a positive attitude

Work can be tiring and demanding, and so it's nice to have somebody around who succumbs to that stress less easily. If you want to be well-liked at work, then pledge to be that person who embraces a challenge when everyone else is up in arms over it. If you're able to actually motivate those around you, they're bound to appreciate your positive attitude. That said, don't be too much of a ray of sunshine in light of bad news. If your team is told you'll all be working late to meet a deadline, don't sugarcoat it to the point where everyone else gets annoyed. Rather, jump in with a plan to get the work done quickly so you can all get out of there sooner.

It's in your best interest to get your co-workers to like you. Though these tips won't necessarily win you the "most popular" award at work, they should help you get to a place where your relationship with your colleagues improves across the board.

The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.