At The Motley Fool, we've been putting our money where our mouth is. In our "11 O'Clock Stock" series, we've asked our best analysts to recommend 50 great stocks across 50 days. The best part of it all? We're investing $50,000 -- $1,000 in each of the picks. Check back to Fool.com every day next week at 11 a.m. ET for a new idea!

Here's a recap of last week's selections:

Monday
Molson Coors Brewing
(NYSE: TAP): Inside Value analyst Andy Louis-Charles started the week by recommending that investors "tap the Rockies." Andy likes Molson Coors Brewing for its strong brands and compelling valuation. Applying a modest 4% growth clip over the next decade, Andy pegs Molson Coors' fair value between $57 and $62 per share, well below its current share price of $45. Read more in Molson Coors' buy recommendation.

Tuesday
Texas Instruments
(NYSE: TXN): The chip stocks are invading "11 O'Clock Stocks!" Fresh off other analyst recommendations to buy Qualcomm and Marvell, Fool.com analyst Jordan DiPietro recommends that investors also take a look at Texas Instruments. The company's decision to abandon its key baseband segment may have left some investors puzzled, but Jordan thinks TI's strength in analog chips and other segments leaves the company well-positioned to recover lost revenues and forge a stronger future. Read our full buy recommendation for Texas Instruments.

Wednesday
Lumber Liquidators
(NYSE: LL): Motley Fool Hidden Gems analyst Jeremy Myers thinks Lumber Liquidators' business model is a thing of beauty. By focusing only on hardwood, and reducing costs by renting out cheap storefront locations, Lumber Liquidators can sell flooring well below industry prices while maintaining outsized returns on invested capital. Despite a solid business model and a clean balance sheet, the housing crunch hit Lumber Liquidators' share price hard, leaving investors a buy-in opportunity on a growing business that dominates its niche. Get the whole story in Lumber Liquidators' buy recommendation.

Thursday
Microsoft
(Nasdaq: MSFT): Fool.com analyst Jim Royal thinks investors need to take a second look at Microsoft. While chatter has ramped up around threats to Microsoft's core business, it still maintains a 94% market share in office software, and more than a 90% market share among PC's. While tablets and smartphones are generating a lot of buzz, Jim says that Microsoft retains an iron grip on the enterprise market, and its strategy for cross-selling a varied portfolio of software only enhances their competitive position. Boot up Microsoft's buy recommendation.

Friday
Aflac
(NYSE: AFL): Andy Cross, advisor of Motley Fool Hidden Gems and associate advisor of Stock Advisor, says Aflac is one of the better plays in the insurance industry. While investors might be more familiar with the company's widely recognized advertising campaign, Aflac actually does most of its business in Japan. The company's deep roots in that country have led to returns on equity that surpass many of Aflac's direct competitors. Trading at only about 10 times earnings expectations, Andy says that the company is poised to outperform in the coming years. Click here to see Aflac's buy recommendation.

We're entering our final week of recommending stocks, so keep coming back to Fool.com for great buy recommendations. "11 O'Clock Stocks" is fun and free, and we're investing along with you.

Microsoft is a Motley Fool Inside Value choice. Lumber Liquidators Holdings is a Motley Fool Rule Breakers recommendation. AFLAC is a Motley Fool Stock Advisor pick. Motley Fool Options has recommended a diagonal call position on Microsoft. The Fool owns shares of AFLAC, Lumber Liquidators Holdings, Microsoft, Molson Coors Brewing, Qualcomm, Marvell and Texas Instruments. Try any of our Foolish newsletter services free for 30 days.

Eric Bleeker owns shares of no companies listed above. True to its name, The Motley Fool is made up of a motley assortment of writers and analysts, each with a unique perspective; sometimes we agree, sometimes we disagree, but we all believe in the power of learning from each other through our Foolish community. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.