Each day I scan the web for the top stories of the day. Here are 10 of the best articles I've seen today.

From around the Web:

1. "Why Economics Failed" by Paul Krugman
Love him or hate him, Krugman offers a compelling critique of our response to the Great Recession in this commentary. He also coins the term "treason of the nerds" (in English) to describe economists who tell the powerful what they want to hear.

2. "Why LinkedIn is morphing from a social network into an online newspaper" by Leo Mirani
This piece from Quartz asks the question: What's LinkedIn actually for?

3. "Einstein: The World As I See It" by Shane Parrish
The best thing I've read today. Albert Einstein once wrote, "The ideals that have lighted my way, and time after time have given me new courage to face life cheerfully, have been Kindness, Beauty, and Truth."

4. "Six Questions for Warren Buffett" by Dan McCrum
Here are some excellent questions to ponder in advance of the Berkshire Hathaway meeting this weekend.

5. "Exxon Sticks With Russia Despite Ukraine Sanctions" by Daniel Gilbert
A fascinating look at why ExxonMobil is forging ahead with its plans to drill in the Arctic, despite tensions between the United States and Russia.

And from Fool.com:

6. "Valuing Apple: Is the Tech Giant Still a Buy at $600?" by Daniel Sparks
A traditional valuation approach to Apple shares.

7. "Is Warren Buffett's Stock Option Reversal Hypocritical?" by Jordan Wathan
Recent remarks by Buffett appear to contradict an earlier position.

8. "BMW Unveils Its Futuristic Super Sedan -- Is This the New 9 Series?" by John Rosevear
BMW feels the luxury car market still has room for expansion.

9. "What Happened to Whole Foods Market?" by Michael Carter
Whole Foods has faced some challenges of late. What does this mean for investors?

10. "Why Are Ford's Car Sales Slipping?" by John Rosevear
Ford is selling less to rental-car companies. Here's a discussion of what this means to its business.

That's it for today, Fools. Be sure to visit Fool.com over the weekend for our coverage of the Berkshire Hathaway event.

This article represents the opinion of the writer, who may disagree with the “official” recommendation position of a Motley Fool premium advisory service. We’re motley! Questioning an investing thesis -- even one of our own -- helps us all think critically about investing and make decisions that help us become smarter, happier, and richer.