Doing These 24 Things at Work Could Land You a Promotion This Year

Author: Daniel B. Kline | July 09, 2019

Two professionally dressed men and two professionally dressed women high-fiving

Source: Getty Images

1 of 25

Be better

Just because the job market has been very strong does not mean that you will get ahead. Getting promoted requires putting yourself in a position to succeed. You need to do the things that get you noticed and help you stand out.

Previous

Next

Person uses laptop and calculator to work with graphs.

Source: Getty Images

2 of 25

1. Be a hard worker

It sounds silly but if you were in management who would you promote -- the lazy guy or the person who works hard? Don't be in the office just to log hours. Do actual work that needs to be done and always do a little more of it than anyone else.

Previous

Next

A woman raising her hand in a group.

Source: Getty Images

3 of 25

2. Volunteer

Put your hand up when it comes time to volunteer for new projects. Be willing to do things that nobody else will do and you will stand out. Be open and happy to put time into projects that are outside your job description -- even if that means extra work you don't get paid for.

ALSO READ: 5 Ways to Get Ahead at Work

Previous

Next

Man filling out a job application on a laptop.

Source: Getty Images

4 of 25

3. Do jobs nobody else wants

Sometimes work is unpleasant. There are tasks nobody wants to do that need to be done. Throw yourself into that breach. Be the person who willingly does whatever needs to be done even when you don't necessarily want to.

Previous

Next

Boss handing envelope of money to employee.

Source: Getty Images

5 of 25

4. Show leadership

Being a leader does not always mean being officially in charge. Sometimes it's as simple as just taking the lead or setting an example for coworkers.

Don't be bossy when you're not the boss. Do show your coworkers a path to getting things done. Lead the way and others will naturally follow.

Previous

Next

Desks are seen in a classroom

Source: Getty Images

6 of 25

5. Learn a new skill

Learn a skill that's needed in your office. It's great if you learn a language or how to juggle, but it's better to focus on skills that actually will make your company function better. That might mean going to school or it could simply be having a coworker cross-train you in a skill that it would be helpful for you to have.

ALSO READ: Why You Shouldn't Go Back to School

Previous

Next

Two coworkers dressed in business attire reviewing paperwork in an open area of an office.

Source: Getty Images

7 of 25

6. Be a good coworker

You want to stand out, but to get ahead you also want your coworkers to recognize your abilities. That means being a good coworker first. Never hesitate to share your time or expertise and always be willing to pitch in when someone else needs help.

Previous

Next

A group of younger coworkers gathers.

Source: Getty Images

8 of 25

7. Share the credit

When you work as part of a team people rarely see the division of labor the same way. Even if you feel like you did more, be generous when it comes to claiming credit. Make it clear that successes are team successes and be sure that other people feel good about their contributions.

Previous

Next

Two people sit around a piece of paper.

Source: Getty Images

9 of 25

8. Get a mentor

Find someone at your company or in your industry who can help guide your way. This can be an informal relationship -- you just need a sounding board to help you avoid making major mistakes.

ALSO READ: The Best Advice I Ever Received From a Mentor

Previous

Next

Man in suit holding umbrella as money rains down around him.

Source: Getty Images

10 of 25

9. Make the company money

The people who bring value tend to get promoted. There are lots of ways to do that, but making the company money should shoot you up the list.

You don't have to be in sales to make your company money. Sometimes one smart introduction or making a connection can start the path to a new deal that you made happen.

Previous

Next

Hand writing the question How Much Can You Save?

Source: Getty Images

11 of 25

10. Save the company money

You don't always have to increase sales to make your company money. You might see an area where money is being wasted and bring it to the attention of the people in charge.

Maybe you know a better way to book hotels or your uncle can get you a company-wide deal on rental cars. Think outside the box. Big companies tend to waste money simply because they have always done things a certain way.

Previous

Next

One wooden figure is higher than the others.

Source: Getty Images

12 of 25

11. Get the boss's attention

If you work at a small company, the boss probably knows who you are. In a larger organization, that may not be the case. If that's true, find a way to get the boss to know who you are and make sure whatever he or she hears about you is overwhelmingly positive.

ALSO READ: What I Learned From Having a Bad Boss

Previous

Next

Two businessmen sit at desk with laptop and chat.

Source: Getty Images

13 of 25

12. Learn a new job

Sometimes a coworkers struggles to take time off because he or she does things that nobody else knows how to do. Make yourself more useful by learning those tasks and being able to offer backup.

Previous

Next

Two young adults facing each other with drawn lightbulbs above their heads.

Source: Getty Images

14 of 25

13. Pitch ideas

Be someone who offers thoughtful ideas. Don't do it too often, but when you see an opportunity to make things better, share your thoughts. Don't just share verbally and don't upstage your boss. Have thoughtful written presentations that lay out what you're proposing and how it might work.

Previous

Next

A young couple unpacking moving boxes.

Source: Getty Images

15 of 25

14. Be willing to move

Sometimes the biggest opportunities don't lie in the place where you live. You might need to consider transferring to another location within your company. That's not always easy, but if you're willing to move you may get bigger opportunities.

ALSO READ: Should You Move for a Job?

Previous

Next

A man leaves an office with a box of belongings.

Source: Getty Images

16 of 25

15. Quit

Sometimes getting a promotion means leaving your company. It's rarely a great idea to walk away without having something lined up, so ideally you should only quit if you land something better.

Previous

Next

Woman touching a search bar on a screen that reads Find Job.

Source: Getty Images

17 of 25

16. Get another offer

Sometimes having another offer makes your company more appreciative of what you bring to the table. If you use this tactic, however, you have to be willing to take the other offer. You don't want to call your company's bluff, have it not make you an offer, and then slink back to your current job.

Previous

Next

Smiling man in a business suit.

Source: Getty Images

18 of 25

17. Dress the part

The old maxim about dressing for the job you want, not the one you have, applies. Don't go from T-shirts to suits, but look at your wardrobe and step things up a little bit. Look at the people in the positions you want and make sure your look fits with how they carry themselves.

ALSO READ: Here's the Perk Workers Want Most This Summer

Previous

Next

A man in an untied tie looks in the mirror.

Source: Getty Images

19 of 25

18. Take a good look at yourself

One of the key things you should do to put yourself in line for a promotion is to look at yourself objectively. Are you boss material? Have you taken the steps needed to be a leader?

Look at yourself objectively and figure out if there are changes you need to make. If there are, make them, and put some distance between yourself and your past.

Previous

Next

A woman holding a coffee and looking at her smartphone while walking.

Source: Getty Images

20 of 25

19. Clean up your social media

The people in charge look at your social media. That means it needs to be PG and fully family friendly. You may also want to avoid politics or taking any stands that the company might not like.

ALSO READ: Fix Your Social Media Before Looking for a Job

Previous

Next

Woman at desk by a window staring at her computer screen.

Source: Getty Images

21 of 25

20. Update your LinkedIn

When you have a job there's no real incentive to update your LinkedIn profile. It's very possible, however, that your boss or human resources may check it out when considering you for a promotion.

Make sure that your profile is up-to-date on the site and that everything you put is true. Make sure you include your current position and that you don't exaggerate any of your responsibilities (because your current boss will most certainly know). 

Previous

Next

Man holding a resume while a job candidate sits across the table.

Source: Getty Images

22 of 25

21. Update your resume

Consider your resume the paper version of your LinkedIn profile. You may not get asked for it during the interview process for a promotion but you should have it ready to go just in case.

Previous

Next

A group of professionals around a table at a meeting.

Source: Getty Images

23 of 25

22. Meet other bosses

If you're interested in other divisions at your company reach out to the person on the level of your boss. Ask if you can meet him or her to learn about their department. If you're interested in positions that are open (or may come open) express your interest. Of course, you should always follow company etiquette which may mean looping your boss in.

ALSO READ: These Traits Are What Make You a Bad Boss, Data Shows

Previous

Next

Coffee mug that says World's Best Boss.

Source: Getty Images

24 of 25

23. Ask

If you want to get promoted it's important to make that known. Tell your boss -- and human resources or other bosses -- about your career goals and ask what it will take to get there.

Sometimes people don't get promoted because their company assumes they're happy doing what they're already doing. Make it clear that you have high hopes for growth.

Previous

Next

Pen resting on top of a to-do list.

Source: Getty Images

25 of 25

24. Make a plan

In addition to letting your boss know you want a promotion, you should also find out what skills or experiences you are lacking. Once you know, make a plan to obtain those skills so you're clearly ready when the right job becomes available.

ALSO READ: Never Say...When Negotiating a Raise

Teresa Kersten, an employee of LinkedIn, a Microsoft subsidiary, is a member of The Motley Fool’s board of directors. Daniel B. Kline owns shares of Microsoft. The Motley Fool owns shares of and recommends Microsoft. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.

Previous

Next